Eliminating Tax Debts in Bankruptcy

Most taxes can't be eliminated in bankruptcy, but some can.

You may hear radio commercials offering the hope of eliminating tax debts in bankruptcy. But it's not as simple as it sounds. Most tax debts can't be wiped out in bankruptcy -- you'll continue to owe them at the end of a Chapter 7 case, or you'll have to repay them in full in your Chapter 13 plan.

If you need to discharge tax debts, Chapter 7 will probably be the better option -- but only if you qualify for Chapter 7 and your debts qualify for discharge.

When You Can Discharge a Tax Debt

You can discharge (wipe out) debts for federal income taxes in Chapter 7 bankruptcy only if all of the following conditions are true:

  • The taxes are income taxes. Taxes other than income, such as payroll taxes or fraud penalties, can never be eliminated in bankruptcy.
  • You did not commit fraud or willful evasion. If you filed a fraudulent tax return or otherwise willfully attempted to evade paying taxes, such as using a false Social Security number on your tax return, bankruptcy can't help.
  • The debt is at least three years old. To eliminate a tax debt, the tax return must have been originally due at least three years before you filed for bankruptcy.
  • You filed a tax return. You must have filed a tax return for the debt you wish to discharge at least two years before filing for bankruptcy.
  • You pass the "240-day rule." The income tax debt must have been assessed by the IRS at least 240 days before you file your bankruptcy petition, or must not have been assessed yet. (This time limit may be extended if the IRS suspended collection activity because of an offer in compromise or a previous bankruptcy filing.)
The Effect of Federal Tax Liens

If your taxes qualify for discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, your victory may be bittersweet. This is because prior recorded tax liens are not affected by your filing. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy will wipe out your personal obligation to pay the debt, and prevent the IRS from going after your bank account or wages, but any lien recorded before you file for bankruptcy remains. In effect, this means you'll have to pay off the lien in order to sell the property.

Copyright 2005 Nolo

Client Reviews
★★★★★
I was provided with a free consultation and was given great advice. I would definitely recommend Chip Parker to anyone who needs assistance with financial law. Meagan
★★★★★
Chip's law firm helped me through the bankruptcy process with ease. The staff was always willing to answer questions and ensured that their answers were provided in a timely manner. A great firm to represent you. Kevin
★★★★★
Mr. Parker and Mr. DuFresne along with their staff went the full mile to help my wife and I through some tough financial difficulties. They take great pride in doing what thy do and I would recommend them to anyone. Robert
★★★★★
Chip Parker autographs his work with excellence. Finding an attorney with real integrity in today's world of law is not an easy task. Chip believes in balancing the scale of Justice and removes the blind fold so the injustices are clearly seen. Thanks for all the good you and your firm achieve. Joy
★★★★★
I took a very complex problem to Chip, and he spent a generous amount of time outlining specific options. Chip has an amazing ability to grasp the important issues and quickly narrow down the key points. He is the best person to have on your side. Phenie